The last page of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson wrote at the bottom of the page:     “LO, I HAVE SEEN THE OPEN HAND OF GOD      AND IN IT NOTHING, NOTHING, SAVE THE ROD      OF MINE AFFLICTION……                                   —THE TROJAN WOMEN”
—
     “Lo, I have seen the open hand of God;     And in it nothing, nothing, save the rod     Of mine affliction…”     Words spoken by Hecuba in The Trojan Women by Euripides.
     Hecuba, to whom Markson makes mention on pgs. 93-94 of his masterpiece Wittgenstein’s Mistress:     “But what I am actually now thinking about, for some reason, is the scene in The Trojan Women where the Greek soldiers throw Hector’s poor baby boy over the city’s walls, so that he will not grow up to take revenge for his father or for Troy.     God, the thing men used to do.     Irene Papas was an effective Helen in the film of The Trojan Women, however.     Katharine Hepburn was an effective Hecuba, as well.     Hecuba was Hector’s mother. Well, which is to say she was the baby boy’s grandmother also, of course.     Just imagine how Katharine Hepburn must have felt.”
    Nothing, nothing, save the rod of mine affliction……

     The last page of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson wrote at the bottom of the page:
     “LO, I HAVE SEEN THE OPEN HAND OF GOD
     AND IN IT NOTHING, NOTHING, SAVE THE ROD
     OF MINE AFFLICTION……
                                   —THE TROJAN WOMEN”

     “Lo, I have seen the open hand of God;
     And in it nothing, nothing, save the rod
     Of mine affliction…”
     Words spoken by Hecuba in The Trojan Women by Euripides.

     Hecuba, to whom Markson makes mention on pgs. 93-94 of his masterpiece Wittgenstein’s Mistress:
     “But what I am actually now thinking about, for some reason, is the scene in The Trojan Women where the Greek soldiers throw Hector’s poor baby boy over the city’s walls, so that he will not grow up to take revenge for his father or for Troy.
     God, the thing men used to do.
     Irene Papas was an effective Helen in the film of The Trojan Women, however.
     Katharine Hepburn was an effective Hecuba, as well.
     Hecuba was Hector’s mother. Well, which is to say she was the baby boy’s grandmother also, of course.
     Just imagine how Katharine Hepburn must have felt.”

    Nothing, nothing, save the rod of mine affliction……

     Pg. 257 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson placed a check next to and underlined a stage direction in Euripides’ The Bacchae:     “(who during the rest of this scene, with a few exceptions, simply speaks the thoughts that Dionysus puts into him, losing power over his own mind)”
     In addition to some other underlining of lines by Dionysus and Pentheus.
—
     Speaking of Dionysus putting thoughts into one’s head and losing power over one’s own mind…
     “The myth that Dionysus invented wine.      On Mount Nysa.      In Libya.”     Wrote Markson on pg. 163 of Vanishing Point.

     Pg. 257 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson placed a check next to and underlined a stage direction in Euripides’ The Bacchae:
     “(who during the rest of this scene, with a few exceptions, simply speaks the thoughts that Dionysus puts into him, losing power over his own mind)”

     In addition to some other underlining of lines by Dionysus and Pentheus.

     Speaking of Dionysus putting thoughts into one’s head and losing power over one’s own mind…

     “The myth that Dionysus invented wine.
     On Mount Nysa.
     In Libya.”
     Wrote Markson on pg. 163 of Vanishing Point.

     Pg. 314 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson put an X in the margins next to the following line (which he also underlined) from Euripides’ Iphigenia in Aulis:     “And so for Helen’s sake my girl is doomed?”
—
     Once again, as always with Euripides, the blame Helen game…
     “There is no description of Helen’s beauty anywhere in the Iliad.      Strangely like is she to some deathless goddess to look upon, being all that is said.      Though the Trojan elders do acknowledge that no one could be blamed for having endured a war because of her.”      - David Markson, This Is Not A Novel, pg. 29.
     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.     I do not remember how much later, but much later.”     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 194-195.
     “You go wherever you like. I’m not about to get myself killed for that wife Helen of yours.      Says Agamemnon to Menelaus—essentially about commencing the Trojan  War—in the little that remains of a lost play by Euripides.”     - David Markson, The Last Novel, pg. 132.
     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if  Euripides  had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not  remember  Helen, either.      So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.”     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 196.

     Pg. 314 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson put an X in the margins next to the following line (which he also underlined) from Euripides’ Iphigenia in Aulis:
     “And so for Helen’s sake my girl is doomed?”

     Once again, as always with Euripides, the blame Helen game…

     “There is no description of Helen’s beauty anywhere in the Iliad.
     Strangely like is she to some deathless goddess to look upon, being all that is said.
     Though the Trojan elders do acknowledge that no one could be blamed for having endured a war because of her.”
     - David Markson, This Is Not A Novel, pg. 29.

     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.
     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.
     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.
     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.
     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.
     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.
     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.
     I do not remember how much later, but much later.”
     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 194-195.

     “You go wherever you like. I’m not about to get myself killed for that wife Helen of yours.
     Says Agamemnon to Menelaus—essentially about commencing the Trojan War—in the little that remains of a lost play by Euripides.”
     - David Markson, The Last Novel, pg. 132.

     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if Euripides had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not remember Helen, either.
     So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.”
     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 196.

     Pgs. 58 and 59 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson has underlined two passages from Euripides’ Helen:     The first:     “Withhold then the malignant blade from thy sister, and believe that she herein is acting with discretion.”     The second (the final lines of the play):     “Many are the forms the heavenly will assumes; and many a thing God brings to pass contrary to expectation: that which was looked for is not accomplished, while Heaven finds out a way for what we never hoped; e’en such has been the issue here.”
—
     As it says in the note on pg. 59 in the above scan, the final lines of Helen are “found likewise at the conclusion of the Alcestis, Andromache, The Bacchae, and, with a slight addition, the Medea.”
     Markson noted this on pg. 67 in The Last Novel:     “Andromache. Alcestis. Helen. Medea. The Bacchae.     Each of which Euripides ends with his chorus speaking an identical verse—to the effect that the ways of the gods are unpredictable.”

     Pgs. 58 and 59 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson has underlined two passages from Euripides’ Helen:
     The first:
     “Withhold then the malignant blade from thy sister, and believe that she herein is acting with discretion.”
     The second (the final lines of the play):
     “Many are the forms the heavenly will assumes; and many a thing God brings to pass contrary to expectation: that which was looked for is not accomplished, while Heaven finds out a way for what we never hoped; e’en such has been the issue here.”

     As it says in the note on pg. 59 in the above scan, the final lines of Helen are “found likewise at the conclusion of the Alcestis, Andromache, The Bacchae, and, with a slight addition, the Medea.”

     Markson noted this on pg. 67 in The Last Novel:
     “Andromache. Alcestis. Helen. Medea. The Bacchae.
    
Each of which Euripides ends with his chorus speaking an identical verse—to the effect that the ways of the gods are unpredictable.”

     Pg. 992 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson underlined a few lines from The Trojan Women (by Euripides), where Menelaus curses Helen:     “And now I seek…     Curse her! I scarce can speak the name she bears,     That was my wife.”
—
     Oh Helen and the blame game…
     “There is no description of Helen’s beauty anywhere in the Iliad.      Strangely like is she to some deathless goddess to look upon, being all that is said.      Though the Trojan elders do acknowledge that no one could be blamed for having endured a war because of her.”      - David Markson, This Is Not A Novel, pg. 29.
     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.     I do not remember how much later, but much later.”     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 194-195.
     “You go wherever you like. I’m not about to get myself killed for that wife Helen of yours.     Says Agamemnon to Menelaus—essentially about commencing the Trojan War—in the little that remains of a lost play by Euripides.”     - David Markson, The Last Novel, pg. 132.
     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if  Euripides had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not  remember Helen, either.      So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.”     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 196.

     Pg. 992 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson underlined a few lines from The Trojan Women (by Euripides), where Menelaus curses Helen:
     “And now I seek…
     Curse her! I scarce can speak the name she bears,
     That was my wife.”

     Oh Helen and the blame game…

     “There is no description of Helen’s beauty anywhere in the Iliad.
     Strangely like is she to some deathless goddess to look upon, being all that is said.
     Though the Trojan elders do acknowledge that no one could be blamed for having endured a war because of her.”
     - David Markson, This Is Not A Novel, pg. 29.

     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.
     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.
     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.
     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.
     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.
     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.
     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.
     I do not remember how much later, but much later.”
     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 194-195.

     “You go wherever you like. I’m not about to get myself killed for that wife Helen of yours.
     Says Agamemnon to Menelaus—essentially about commencing the Trojan War—in the little that remains of a lost play by Euripides.”
     - David Markson, The Last Novel, pg. 132.

     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if Euripides had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not remember Helen, either.
     So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.”
     - David Markson, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, pgs. 196.

     Pg. 754 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson underlined three passages in Euripides’ Medea, just after the titular character has slain her children offstage:     1) “Thy sons are dead; slain by their own mother’s hand.”     2) “MEDEA appears above the house, on a chariot drawn by dragons; the children’s corpses are beside her.”     (This also gets an angular bracket marking in the margins.)     3) “Having borne me sons to glut thy passion’s lust, thou now hast slain them.”     (This also gets an X in the margins.)
—
     The scene of Medea murdering her sons is not shown, interestingly enough.
     In fact:     “Not one of the violent moments in Greek tragedy occurs on stage. Medea murdering her sons, for instance. Or Orestes bloodying Clytemnestra.”     Wrote Markson on pg. 70 of Reader’s Block.

     Pg. 754 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson underlined three passages in Euripides’ Medea, just after the titular character has slain her children offstage:
     1) “Thy sons are dead; slain by their own mother’s hand.”
     2) “MEDEA appears above the house, on a chariot drawn by dragons; the children’s corpses are beside her.”
     (This also gets an angular bracket marking in the margins.)
     3) “Having borne me sons to glut thy passion’s lust, thou now hast slain them.”
     (This also gets an X in the margins.)

     The scene of Medea murdering her sons is not shown, interestingly enough.

     In fact:
     “Not one of the violent moments in Greek tragedy occurs on stage. Medea murdering her sons, for instance. Or Orestes bloodying Clytemnestra.”
     Wrote Markson on pg. 70 of Reader’s Block.

     Pg. 826 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson underlined part of a speech by the eponymous character in Euripides’ Hecuba:     “I may be a slave and weak as well, but the gods are strong, and custom too which prevails o’er them, for by custom it is that we believe in them and set up bounds of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to thee, is to be set at naught, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods, then is all fairness in things human at an end.”
—
     “The first writer known to condemn slavery is Euripides.”     Markson notes on pg. 175 of his novel Reader’s Block.

     Pg. 826 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson underlined part of a speech by the eponymous character in Euripides’ Hecuba:
     “I may be a slave and weak as well, but the gods are strong, and custom too which prevails o’er them, for by custom it is that we believe in them and set up bounds of right and wrong for our lives. Now if this principle, when referred to thee, is to be set at naught, and they are to escape punishment who murder guests or dare to plunder the temples of gods, then is all fairness in things human at an end.”

     “The first writer known to condemn slavery is Euripides.”
     Markson notes on pg. 175 of his novel Reader’s Block.

     Pg. 987 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson underlined and bracketed various passages in an exchange between Talthybius and Andromache in The Trojan Woman by Euripides.
—
     The exchange that is partially underlined in the above scan, starting with “‘Tis their will” and ending with “But from this crested wall Of Troy be dashed, and die,” appears, abridged and slightly varied, in Markson’s last novel The Last Novel:     “‘Tis their will—that thy son from this crested wall of Troy be dashed to death.” (Pg. 176).
     This quote is unattributed in The Last Novel, yet immediately after reciting it, Markson writes:     “The most tragic of the poets.     Aristotle called Euripides.” (Pg. 176).

     Pg. 987 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson underlined and bracketed various passages in an exchange between Talthybius and Andromache in The Trojan Woman by Euripides.

     The exchange that is partially underlined in the above scan, starting with “‘Tis their will” and ending with “But from this crested wall Of Troy be dashed, and die,” appears, abridged and slightly varied, in Markson’s last novel The Last Novel:
     “‘Tis their will—that thy son from this crested wall of Troy be dashed to death.” (Pg. 176).

     This quote is unattributed in The Last Novel, yet immediately after reciting it, Markson writes:
     “The most tragic of the poets.
     Aristotle called Euripides.” (Pg. 176).

     Pg. 957 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson bracketed the first two paragraphs of the Introduction to Euripides’ The Trojan Women, and also placed underlines under the following three ideas:     1) “The poet’s thought is increasingly marked by a pervading sense of disillusionment.”     2) “The whole episode is treated brilliantly by Thucydides, who is unmitigated in his condemnation of the crime.”     3) “Not strictly speaking a play, but rather a tragic pageant.”
—
     The Trojan Women gets quite a bit of mention in Markson’s masterpiece Wittgenstein’s Mistress, some of which I will relay below…
     “Irene Papas would have been an effective Electra, however.     In fact she was an effective Helen, in The Trojan Women, by Euripides.     Perhaps I have not indicated that I watched a certain few films whle I still possessed devices, also.     Irene Papas and Katharine Hepburn in The Trojan Women was one. Maria Callas in Medea was another.” (Pgs. 25-26).
     “Once, when I was listening to myself read the Greek plays out loud, certain of the lines sounded as if they had been written under the influence of William Shakespeare.     One had to be quite perplexed as to how Aeschylus or Euripides might have read Shakespeare.     I did remember an anecdote, about some other Greek author, who had remarked that if he could be positive of a life after death he would happily hang himself to see Euripides. Basically this did not seem relevant, however.     Finally it occurred to me that the translator had no doubt read Shakespeare.     Normally I would not consider that a memorable insight, except for the fact that I was otherwise undeniably mad at the time when I read the plays.     As a matter of fact I only now realize that I may not have been cooking after all, when I burned that other house to the ground, but may well have burned it in the process of dropping the pages of The Trojan Women into the fire after I had finished reading their reverse sides.” (Pgs. 38-39).
     “All of the books in the store were actually in Greek, naturally.     Possibly some few of them were actually books that I had even read, in English, although naturally I would have no way of knowing which ones.     Possibly one of them was even a Greek edition of William Shakespeare’s plays. By a translator who had been under the influence of Euripides.” (Pg. 45).
     “But what I am actually now thinking about, for some reason, is the scene in The Trojan Women where the Greek soldiers throw Hector’s poor baby boy over the city’s walls, so that he will not grow up to take revenge for his father or for Troy.     God, the thing men used to do.     Irene Papas was an effective Helen in the film of The Trojan Women, however.     Katharine Hepburn was an effective Hecuba, as well.     Hecuba was Hector’s mother. Well, which is to say she was the baby boy’s grandmother also, of course.     Just imagine how Katharine Hepburn must have felt.” (Pgs. 93-94).
     “Although now what I tardily might wish I had done, while I was at the other house, was to see if any of the versions in that one-volume selection from the plays were by the translator who made Euripides sound as if he had been under the influence of William Shakespeare.     In spite of that, one has a fairly acute inkling as to when Medea is having her period also, incidentally.” (Pg. 101).
     “Yesterday I took the books out of the carton.     With only one exception, every single one of them was in a foreign language.     Most were in German, in fact, although not all.     The one book not in German or in another foreign language was an edition of The Trojan Women, by Euripides, which had been translated from Greek into English.     By Gilbert Murray.     I believe the person who had translated it was Gilbert Murray.     As a matter of fact I am not now certain I looked.     One finds that many of the Greek plays have been translated by Gilbert Murray, however.” (Pg. 164).
     “Downstairs they go, every last one of the troublesome things.     Granting that this would in no way explain why the translation of The Trojan Women happened to be included, although surely this can be dismissed as an oversight.     When one comes down to it there are easier things to do than filling eight or nine cartons with books.     Filling eleven cartons with books not being one of them, in fact.” (Pg. 180).
     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.     I do not remember how much later, but much later.” (Pgs. 194-195).
     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if Euripides had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not remember Helen, either.     So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.” (Pg. 196).

     Pg. 957 of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume One by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson bracketed the first two paragraphs of the Introduction to Euripides’ The Trojan Women, and also placed underlines under the following three ideas:
     1) “The poet’s thought is increasingly marked by a pervading sense of disillusionment.”
     2) “The whole episode is treated brilliantly by Thucydides, who is unmitigated in his condemnation of the crime.”
     3) “Not strictly speaking a play, but rather a tragic pageant.”

     The Trojan Women gets quite a bit of mention in Markson’s masterpiece Wittgenstein’s Mistress, some of which I will relay below…

     “Irene Papas would have been an effective Electra, however.
     In fact she was an effective Helen, in The Trojan Women, by Euripides.
     Perhaps I have not indicated that I watched a certain few films whle I still possessed devices, also.
     Irene Papas and Katharine Hepburn in The Trojan Women was one. Maria Callas in Medea was another.” (Pgs. 25-26).

     “Once, when I was listening to myself read the Greek plays out loud, certain of the lines sounded as if they had been written under the influence of William Shakespeare.
     One had to be quite perplexed as to how Aeschylus or Euripides might have read Shakespeare.
     I did remember an anecdote, about some other Greek author, who had remarked that if he could be positive of a life after death he would happily hang himself to see Euripides. Basically this did not seem relevant, however.
     Finally it occurred to me that the translator had no doubt read Shakespeare.
     Normally I would not consider that a memorable insight, except for the fact that I was otherwise undeniably mad at the time when I read the plays.
     As a matter of fact I only now realize that I may not have been cooking after all, when I burned that other house to the ground, but may well have burned it in the process of dropping the pages of The Trojan Women into the fire after I had finished reading their reverse sides.” (Pgs. 38-39).

     “All of the books in the store were actually in Greek, naturally.
     Possibly some few of them were actually books that I had even read, in English, although naturally I would have no way of knowing which ones.
     Possibly one of them was even a Greek edition of William Shakespeare’s plays. By a translator who had been under the influence of Euripides.” (Pg. 45).

     “But what I am actually now thinking about, for some reason, is the scene in The Trojan Women where the Greek soldiers throw Hector’s poor baby boy over the city’s walls, so that he will not grow up to take revenge for his father or for Troy.
     God, the thing men used to do.
     Irene Papas was an effective Helen in the film of The Trojan Women, however.
     Katharine Hepburn was an effective Hecuba, as well.
     Hecuba was Hector’s mother. Well, which is to say she was the baby boy’s grandmother also, of course.
     Just imagine how Katharine Hepburn must have felt.” (Pgs. 93-94).

     “Although now what I tardily might wish I had done, while I was at the other house, was to see if any of the versions in that one-volume selection from the plays were by the translator who made Euripides sound as if he had been under the influence of William Shakespeare.
     In spite of that, one has a fairly acute inkling as to when Medea is having her period also, incidentally.” (Pg. 101).

     “Yesterday I took the books out of the carton.
     With only one exception, every single one of them was in a foreign language.
     Most were in German, in fact, although not all.
     The one book not in German or in another foreign language was an edition of The Trojan Women, by Euripides, which had been translated from Greek into English.
     By Gilbert Murray.
     I believe the person who had translated it was Gilbert Murray.
     As a matter of fact I am not now certain I looked.
     One finds that many of the Greek plays have been translated by Gilbert Murray, however.” (Pg. 164).

     “Downstairs they go, every last one of the troublesome things.
     Granting that this would in no way explain why the translation of The Trojan Women happened to be included, although surely this can be dismissed as an oversight.
     When one comes down to it there are easier things to do than filling eight or nine cartons with books.
     Filling eleven cartons with books not being one of them, in fact.” (Pg. 180).

     “Although what one doubts even more sincerely is that Helen would have been the cause of that war to begin with, of course.
     After all, a single Spartan girl, as Walt Whitman once called her.
     Even if in The Trojan Women Euripides does let everybody be furious at Helen.
     In the Odyssey, where she has a splendid radiant dignity, nothing of that sort is hinted at at all.
     And even in the Iliad, when the war is still going on, she is generally treated with respect.
     So unquestionably it was only later that people decided it had been Helen’s fault.
     Well, Euripides of course coming much later than Homer on his own part, for instance.
     I do not remember how much later, but much later.” (Pgs. 194-195).

     “And which furthermore now makes me realize that if Euripides had not blamed Helen for the war very possibly I would not remember Helen, either.
     So that doubtless it was quite hasty of me, to criticize Rainer Maria Rilke or Euripides.” (Pg. 196).

     The second page of the Table of Contents of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):
     On which Markson made a number of markings.     Underlining and placing checks next to plays by Euripides and Aristophanes.
—
     Am reminded:    “Once more before he dies Protagonist will read Aristophanes.”     - David Markson, Reader’s Block, pg. 179.
     On the next page of that novel, pg. 180, Markson writes the name of one of Aristophanes’ plays:     “Thesmophoriazusae.”
     Wonder if Markson was able to read Aristophanes once more before he died?
     Specifically, did he reread Thesmophoriazusae?

     The second page of the Table of Contents of David Markson’s copy of The Complete Greek Drama: Volume Two by Various (Ed. Whitney J. Oates & Eugene O’Neill, Jr.):

     On which Markson made a number of markings.
     Underlining and placing checks next to plays by Euripides and Aristophanes.

     Am reminded:
    “Once more before he dies Protagonist will read Aristophanes.”
     - David Markson, Reader’s Block, pg. 179.

     On the next page of that novel, pg. 180, Markson writes the name of one of Aristophanes’ plays:
     “Thesmophoriazusae.”

     Wonder if Markson was able to read Aristophanes once more before he died?

     Specifically, did he reread Thesmophoriazusae?