The first page of David Markson’s copy of Candor and Perversion: Literature, Education, and the Arts by Roger Shattuck:
     On which Markson wrote his last name as an inscription, and underlined it.
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     Soon after Roger Shattuck died on December 8th, 2005, his colleague Harold Bloom said of his fellow critic: “He was an old-fashioned, in a good sense, man of letters. He incarnated his love for literature.”
     Same could have been said of David Markson, who died four and a half years later on June 4th, 2010.
     He was an old-fashioned, in a good sense, man of letters. He incarnated his love for literature.

     The first page of David Markson’s copy of Candor and Perversion: Literature, Education, and the Arts by Roger Shattuck:

     On which Markson wrote his last name as an inscription, and underlined it.

     Soon after Roger Shattuck died on December 8th, 2005, his colleague Harold Bloom said of his fellow critic: “He was an old-fashioned, in a good sense, man of letters. He incarnated his love for literature.”

     Same could have been said of David Markson, who died four and a half years later on June 4th, 2010.

     He was an old-fashioned, in a good sense, man of letters. He incarnated his love for literature.