The first page of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:
     On which Markson wrote, as an inscription:     “Markson     —-NYC”
—
     Good thing this is the first page and not the thirteenth.
     “Sholom Aleichem never submitted a manuscript containing a page numbered thirteen.”     - Markson, Reader’s Block, pg. 43.

     The first page of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:

     On which Markson wrote, as an inscription:
     “Markson
     —-NYC”

     Good thing this is the first page and not the thirteenth.

     “Sholom Aleichem never submitted a manuscript containing a page numbered thirteen.”
     - Markson, Reader’s Block, pg. 43.

     The second page of the Table of Contents of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:
     On which Markson has placed two dashes/marks in the margin next to two stories:     1) “Tevye Goes to Palestine”     2) “Get Thee Out”
—
     Both of these stories feature the character Tevye the Milkman.
     Yes, also of The Fiddler on the Roof fame.     (The landmark Broadway musical was based on Sholom Aleichem’s stories.)
     Otherwise known as:     “Tevya der Milchiger”     A name mentioned on pg. 49 of Markson’s novel Reader’s Block.

     The second page of the Table of Contents of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:

     On which Markson has placed two dashes/marks in the margin next to two stories:
     1) “Tevye Goes to Palestine”
     2) “Get Thee Out”

     Both of these stories feature the character Tevye the Milkman.

     Yes, also of The Fiddler on the Roof fame.
     (The landmark Broadway musical was based on Sholom Aleichem’s stories.)

     Otherwise known as:
     “Tevya der Milchiger”
     A name mentioned on pg. 49 of Markson’s novel Reader’s Block.

     Pg. 96 of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:
     On which Markson has placed a line and a check next to the following lines of dialogue:     “‘A second Gorky? And who, may I ask, was the first Gorky?’     ‘Gorky,’ she said, ‘is one of the greatest men living in the world today.’”
—
     This idea of a second Gorky reminds me of a mention of Maxim Gorky and Arshile Gorky on pg. 18 of Markson’s last novel The Last Novel:     “Vosdanig Manoog Adoian, who changed his name to Arshile Gorky—and simultaneously announced that he was the nephew of the writer.     Not knowing that the other Gorky was not really named Gorky either.”
     A second Gorky?
     And who, may I ask, was the first Gorky?

     Pg. 96 of David Markson’s copy of Tevye’s Daughters: Collected Stories of Sholom Aleichem by Sholom Aleichem:

     On which Markson has placed a line and a check next to the following lines of dialogue:
     “‘A second Gorky? And who, may I ask, was the first Gorky?’
     ‘Gorky,’ she said, ‘is one of the greatest men living in the world today.’”

     This idea of a second Gorky reminds me of a mention of Maxim Gorky and Arshile Gorky on pg. 18 of Markson’s last novel The Last Novel:
     “Vosdanig Manoog Adoian, who changed his name to Arshile Gorky—and simultaneously announced that he was the nephew of the writer.
     Not knowing that the other Gorky was not really named Gorky either.”

     A second Gorky?

     And who, may I ask, was the first Gorky?